Democrats Promise to Filibuster — and Kill — National Reciprocity for Concealed Carry in the U.S. Senate

 

U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) says national reciprocity efforts in the Senate are dead on arrival. Official U.S. Senate photo.

 

Since the election on November 8, 2016, there has been some hope that national reciprocity for concealed handgun permits would be similar to that for driver’s licenses. If you have a driver’s license in Florida, you can drive all the way to Maine or Washington state or drive in Alaska or Hawaii. See our previous coverage of the topic here, here, and here.

Independent Program Attorney Emily Taylor, a lawyer at the firm of Walker & Byington in Houston, said, “That is not the case with permitted concealed handguns. If you are a truck driver who is carrying valuable shipments, and you have to travel in California, Illinois, New York or some other states, you are effectively banned from carrying over your entire trip. Since you can’t carry in New York State, there is no way that you can go from New England to the rest of the country or vice versa.”

National reciprocity would be an answer to this problem, she said, but with only 52 Republicans in the Senate and 60 votes needed to stop a filibuster, Democrats are promising to kill any reciprocity bill.

From the Wall Street Journal:

Peter Ambler, executive director of Americans for Responsible Solutions, a gun control super PAC, said his organization plans to fight national reciprocity “tooth and nail,” threatening a Democratic filibuster of the legislation in the Senate.

“It’s a race to the bottom,” he said. “It allows people that have permits from states with the weakest standards possible to carry [weapons] in the streets of any U.S. city.”

Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal, a Democrat and ardent gun-control advocate, said he believes any version of a national reciprocity bill would be “dead on arrival” in the Senate, due to strong Democratic opposition….

Ambler’s argument about the race to the bottom is easy to deal with, said IPA Taylor. “Permit holders are not only incredibly law-abiding,” she said, “but there is also no evidence of more problems with permit holders in states that have relatively looser regulations on who can carry.”

Click here to see a study comparing conviction rates between police and concealed carry permit holders conducted by John R. Lott, Jr., Contributing Editor to Texas & U.S. Law Shield blog.

 

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